When shopping for CPU…

AMD or Intel

Think about brand such as AMD or Intel? WRONG!

We do not shop by brand but what delivers us the best Performance, Features and Quality for the money we spending! And to make this crystal clear, AMD and Intel both make extremely high-quality microprocessors. The two major makers of microprocessors, Intel and AMD, tend to leapfrog each other every few years. At the moment, Intel’s new line of chips, the i3, i5 and i7 (you may have heard them referred to as Sandy Bridge) are clearly superior to AMD’s offerings on the higher end. At the low end, AMD offers good value, and if you’re looking to save money go with a computer carrying that company’s processor. AMD will unveil its own new line of high-end chips in a few months, and the game will continue.

At the moment, Intel’s new line of chips, the i3, i5 and i7 (you may have heard them referred to as Sandy Bridge) are clearly superior to AMD’s offerings on the higher end. At the low end, AMD offers good value, and if you’re looking to save money go with a computer carrying that company’s processor. AMD will unveil its own new line of high-end chips in a few months, and the game will continue.

If you already have your PC and your upgrading is to make sure your shopping for CPU that actually fits in the fracking motherboard that you’re planning to use. Don’t feel bad about leading to look it up.

Intel, for example maintains Cori generation products across two different physical sockets (LGA 2011 & LGA 1150) at any given time, and often has a trailing orders sockets along with more complex electrical compatibilities, so go ahead and ask KING IT see which fits your motherboard.

Are Intel’s new chips really better than the old?

They are more efficient, which is to say they get more work done in the same amount of time. Speed in CPU terms is analogous to the ticks of a clock. More speed means that the clock is ticking faster. As the clock ticks, the chip handles instructions, mathematical algorithms that when translated tell the computer what to do. It used to be that the faster the clock ticked, the better off you were.

Speed of the processor was a very big deal, and computer makers would use that number to hype their machines. But after a while, increases in raw speed no longer led to increases in efficiency. As chips got faster, they used more power and generated more heat, without getting much more work done. In essence, Intel and AMD reached a point of diminishing returns when it came to clock speed and looked for other ways to increase the efficiency of their chips.

The new generation of chips get a lot more work done during every tick of the clock, and that’s what you need to care about — along with the ability to render graphics, says McCarron, the principal analyst of Mercury Research, who has followed chips and chip design closely for a couple of decades.

What about graphics?

PCs handle graphics in two different ways. They can be integrated into the processor, or they can be handled by a separate, or discrete, graphics card. If you’re a gamer, or do a lot of demanding, graphics-oriented work such as CAD or serious video editing, then spending an extra $100 or $150 for a discrete graphics card is a smart investment, McCarron advises.

But if you’re mainly using your computer to surf the Web, use Office-like applications and stream video you’ll be fine without a graphics card. However, some chips with integrated graphics capability do a better job than others, and that’s where the Sandy Bridge family stands out, says McCarron. On average, graphics performance of the new line of chips is about twice that of the earlier generation, enough of a difference to be noticeable in the real world.

How to define a CPU’s performance?

Performance used to be simple, the younger viewer may be surprised as not only the AMD and Intel CPU used to perform the same clock for clock, but they even fit in the same motherboard is that one point. Comparisons were easy, whoever had the faster clock speed was faster, and the megahertz war was born then everything started changing because the megahertz or gigahertz or frequency of the CPU became no longer any more meaningful than gaging the performance of a car by how many RPM’s the engine spins at and yet, it’s a useful matrix somewhat but only if we have other information at the same time. So let’s talk about other information:

We need to know how much work can a CPU perform with each of those cycles? How many instruction per clock it can perform?

If CPU A run at 2GHz, 1 instruction per cycle and CPU B run at 1GHz, 2 instruction per cycle, then they actually do the exact same amount of work. So the only way to measure which one is really better is by running real world test. But, running just one test is not enough to judge the CPU’s performance either. As modern CPU has multiple processing cores and sign toms and well some benchmark will measure the top speed of the single core with more power redirected to the turbo mode, other benchmarks will tell us more about how that CPU behaves with that heavier load that spread across all of the process and cores are multi-threated testing, other test will tell us if the CPU has enough cash keep up with the particular workload.

In a perfect world, you want to find websites that test the exact application you using, most frequently see you know exact what you’re getting and that’s the only way you figure it out. But, let’s continue to the chronology, for some people, it doesn’t just about how fast you go, what about creature come first like air conditioning, cruise control? CPU reviews from reputable sites like Tech Report, Hardware Canucks and PC Perspective, will give you a rundown other important information like Power consumption, Heat output, Security features, Max memory and Expected overclocking limits and so much more… and once you got all of that information, you’re ready to make a fantastic decision and what’s the best value for your money.

Below is a listing of some of the more commonly used names of the processor and a brief description on each of them.

Intel family names:

Pentium – The 80586, or P5, the Pentium is the generation above the 486 processor line.

Pentium Pro – Chip designed to help speed up Windows 32-bit software

Pentium with MMX – Processor with additional 57 new instructions and enhanced speed to graphics and multimedia software. MMX is now included in all Intel processors that have been released after this processor.

Pentium II and III – The first of the Intel processors to include the Slot adapters. These processors were the next generations of the Intel Pentium processor.

Intel Coppermine – The Socket (FC-PGA) version of the Intel Pentium III and IV.

Intel Flip Chip – Another name for the Intel Coppermine.

Intel Celeron – The low end Intel processors designed to help lower the prices of the computers by reducing or at first eliminating the level 2 cache.

Pentium IV – The next generation of Intel processors, these processors were over 1GHz and were the FPGA processors.

AMD family names:

AMD K6-2 – Socket 7 processor with the 3DNow! technology and first to have the 100MHz bus.

AMD K6-3 – K6-2 chip with Level 2 cache memory that runs at the speed of the CPU.

AMD Duron – Like the Intel Celeron, the AMD Duron is an affordable solution processor allowing for the price in the overall computer to drop.

AMD Athlon – AMD generation with features such as the 200MHz bus speed

AMD Thunderbird – The latest AMD processor, this processor is the socket version.

If all sounding way too much work to shop for a good CPU, not to worry, KING IT is here for you. Welcome to walk in, or visit KING IT website for more information.